JRCS Second Nuclear Disaster Response Basic Training Session (FY 2015)

2015/11/25


Case study with a radiation emergency
medical care advisor.

Case study with a radiation emergency medical care advisor.

The Japanese Red Cross Society (JRCS) organized and held the FY 2015 Second Nuclear Disaster Response Basic Training Session at the JRCS Headquarters on November 6, 2015. For the summary of the training session, please click here [PDF].

The training session is part of the JRCS’s efforts to enhance preparedness for nuclear disasters based on lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The JRCS already provided this training twice during the last fiscal year, in November 2014 and February 2015 and once in this fiscal year in September. This was the fourth time that the training was held.
The target participants for the training are JRCS relief team members, who are physicians, radiological technologists, nurses and administrative staff working at Japanese Red Cross hospitals throughout Japan and JRCS chapter staff.

The training program includes:

In particular, during the case studies, the attendees simulated relief activities on the assumption of a three-day activity period and the cumulative radiation dose limit (1mSv) during the period. After the case studies, each group made a presentation on their assumed activity plan, calculation results of their cumulative radiation dose based on the plan and their assumed medical relief activities.

Unlike natural disasters, it is difficult to accumulate experience of hands-on response to a nuclear disaster. The JRCS will continue to plan and provide training such as this nuclear disaster response training in order to conduct necessary activities as JRCS relief teams without excessively fearing radiation in the event of a nuclear disaster, which is a sudden unforeseen accident.

To provide training which corresponds to local nuclear disaster preparedness plan, this training will be held by each JRCS block (zone) from Fiscal 2016. The JRCS chapters and facilities are geographically divided into six blocks.

The training materials which have been used for the training session will be released on the Digital Archives. Once they are released, the information will be posted on “Information from Resource Center”.

1. Outline of the training session


(1)Date and time: Friday, November 6, 2015; 11:00-17:00
(2)Venue: Meeting Room 201 and some other rooms at the JRCS Headquarters
(3)No. of participants: 57
   (from Japanese Red Cross hospitals and JRCS chapters across Japan)

(1)Date and time: Friday, November 6, 2015; 11:00-17:00
(2)Venue: Meeting Room 201 and some other rooms at the JRCS Headquarters
(3)No. of participants: 57 (from Japanese Red Cross hospitals and JRCS chapters across Japan)

2. Purpose of the training


For JRCS relief team members to learn basic knowledge about radiation and radiation emergency medical care arrangements, and how to use radiation protective equipment so that they are able to safely engage in relief activities in a radioactive environment with ease.

3. Training program



Case study training.

Case study training.
(1)Opening remarks by the Director General, JRCS Disaster Management and Social Welfare Department
(2)Lecture 1: JRCS efforts for response to nuclear disasters
(3)Lecture 2: Basic knowledge about radiation protection during nuclear disaster relief activities
(4)Lecture 3: Relief team activities and collaboration between the teams and the radiation emergency medical advisors during a nuclear disaster
(5)Workshop 1: Radiation protective equipment and materials (for all participants)
(6)Workshop 2: How to use/maintain a survey meter and a personal dosimeter (for radiological technologists)
(7)Groupwork 1: Case study (for physicians, nurses and administrative staff)
(8)Groupwork 2: Case study (for all participants)
(9)Closing: Final remarks
(1)Opening remarks by the Director General, JRCS Disaster Management and Social Welfare Department
(2)Lecture 1: JRCS efforts for response to nuclear disasters
(3)Lecture 2: Basic knowledge about radiation protection during nuclear disaster relief activities
(4)Lecture 3: Relief team activities and collaboration between the teams and the radiation emergency medical advisors during a nuclear disaster
(5)Workshop 1: Radiation protective equipment and materials (for all participants)
(6)Workshop 2: How to use/maintain a survey meter and a personal dosimeter (for radiological technologists)
(7)Groupwork 1: Case study (for physicians, nurses and administrative staff)
(8)Groupwork 2: Case study (for all participants)
(9)Closing: Final remarks

4. Voices from the participants


Nurse: I engaged in relief activities without having enough knowledge about radiation and nuclear disasters. I really feel the importance of the training like this.

Radiological technologist: I was able to learn the importance of sharing information between relief teams on duty in affected areas and radiation emergency medical care advisors.

Radiological technologist: I never used the reading device of personal dosimeter data, although I am a radiological technologist. The training has helped me very much.

Chapter staff member: The groupwork made me realize that there are various options even in difficult situations during a nuclear disaster.

Physician: It would have been much better if the training program included the content like: who will be responsible for deployment of relief teams in the event of an emergency; and compensations, etc. However, the training made me recognize that I had some misperceptions about radiation exposure, and I found the training very meaningful.


Group report about the case study.

Presentation of a completion certificate
of the nuclear disaster response basic training.

Group report about the case study.

Presentation of a completion certificate of the nuclear disaster response basic training.