JRCS First Nuclear Disaster Response Basic Training Session
(FY 2015)

2015/10/02


Groupwork: Instruction by a radiation
emergency medical care advisor.

Groupwork: Instruction by a radiation emergency medical care advisor.

The Japanese Red Cross Society (JRCS) organized and held the FY 2015 First Nuclear Disaster Response Basic Training Session at the JRCS Headquarters on September 3, 2015. For the summary of the training session, please click here [PDF].

The training session is part of the JRCS’s efforts to enhance preparedness for nuclear disasters based on lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. The JRCS already provided this training twice during last fiscal year, in November 2014 and February 2015. This was the third time that the training was held.

The participants in the training session are JRCS relief team members, who are physicians, radiological technologists, nurses and administrative staff working at Japanese Red Cross hospitals throughout Japan and JRCS chapter staff.

The training program includes:

In particular, for the case studies, the attendees specifically discussed:

  • the selection of relief team members;
  • safe routes to get to a destination safely;
  • decision making;
  • professionals whom JRCS relief team members should ask for advice, etc.

Through the case studies, the attendees renewed their awareness of “CSCA”*1 and “METHANE”*2 which are principles necessary when responding to large-scale disasters, and the importance of collaboration with the radiation emergency medical care advisors.

Nuclear disasters may be seen as less likely to occur. However, the JRCS perceives that it is important to continue to provide relevant training including this training session to JRCS relief team members to allow them to conduct necessary activities in the event of a nuclear disaster.
The next training session is scheduled for November 6, 2015.

*1 CSCA: Acronym for principles of relief activities arrangements (Command & Control; Safety; Communication; and Assessment) during a disaster.
*2 METHANE: Acronym for what needs to be communicated from a disaster scene (Major incident, My call-sign or name; Exact location; Type of incident; Hazards, present or to be expected; Access routes; Number, type and severity of casualties; and Emergency services, present and required).

1. Outline of the training session


(1)Date and time: Thursday, September 3, 2015; 11:00-17:00
(2)Venue: Meeting Room 201 and some other rooms at the JRCS Headquarters
(3)No. of participants: 81 (Japanese Red Cross hospitals and JRCS chapters across Japan)

(1)Date and time: Thursday, September 3, 2015; 11:00-17:00
(2)Venue: Meeting Room 201 and some other rooms at the JRCS Headquarters
(3)No. of participants: 81 (Japanese Red Cross hospitals and JRCS chapters across Japan)

2. Purpose of the training


For JRCS relief team members to learn basic knowledge about radiation and radiation emergency medical care arrangements, and how to use radiation protective equipment so that they are able to safely engage in relief activities in a radioactive environment with ease.

3. Training program



Lecture 3: Dr. Sakai of the Karatsu Red
Cross Hospital, giving a lecture.

Lecture 3: Dr. Sakai of the Karatsu Red Cross Hospital, giving a lecture.
(1)Opening remarks by the Director General, JRCS Disaster Management and Social Welfare Department
(2)Lecture 1: JRCS efforts for response to nuclear disasters
(3)Lecture 2: Basic knowledge about radiation protection during nuclear disaster relief activities
(4)Lecture 3: Relief team activities and collaboration between the teams and the radiation emergency medical advisors during a nuclear disaster
(5)Workshop 1: Radiation protective equipment and materials (for all participants)
(6)Workshop 2: How to use/maintain a survey meter and a personal dosimeter (for radiological technologists)
(7)Groupwork 1: Case study (for physicians, nurses and administrative staff)
(8)Groupwork 2: Case study (for all participants)
(1)Opening remarks by the Director General, JRCS Disaster Management and Social Welfare Department
(2)Lecture 1: JRCS efforts for response to nuclear disasters
(3)Lecture 2: Basic knowledge about radiation protection during nuclear disaster relief activities
(4)Lecture 3: Relief team activities and collaboration between the teams and the radiation emergency medical advisors during a nuclear disaster
(5)Workshop 1: Radiation protective equipment and materials (for all participants)
(6)Workshop 2: How to use/maintain a survey meter and a personal dosimeter (for radiological technologists)
(7)Groupwork 1: Case study (for physicians, nurses and administrative staff)
(8)Groupwork 2: Case study (for all participants)

4. Voices from the participants


A physician: “The training session explained well what a JRCS relief team needs to do if a nuclear disaster occurs and affects a wide area.”

A radiological technologist: “I’m a radiological technologist but I don’t use a personal dosimeter or a survey meter on a regular basis. During the workshop, however, I touched and used them. This experience made me realize that I have to understand how to competently use the equipment in case of a nuclear disaster.”

A nurse: “During the groupwork session, I calculated radiation doses and found it was difficult. I really felt the necessity of a radiological technologist to accompany each relief team in the event of a nuclear disaster. The training session also made me recognize the importance of cooperating with radiation emergency medical care advisors.”

A chapter staff member: “Before I came to the training session, I had a vague sense of fear against the conducting of relief activities during a nuclear disaster. But I think that the participation in the training session to obtain knowledge about radiation gave me the confidence to conduct activities safely.”


Q&A.

Workshop 1: The training program includes
how to use a digital personal dosimeter.

Q&A.

Workshop 1: The training program includes how to use a digital personal dosimeter.